Query a SQL server to find the progress of a database restore

This just came in from a co-worker. Too valuable not to share!

In case you might want to monitor the progress of a database restore on your SQL server, this query shows the progress in percentage, elapsed time, etc…

SELECT
r.session_id,
r.command,CONVERT(NUMERIC(6,2),r.percent_complete) AS [Percent Complete],
CONVERT(VARCHAR(20),DATEADD(ms,r.estimated_completion_time,GetDate()),20) AS [ETA Completion Time],
CONVERT(NUMERIC(10,2),r.total_elapsed_time/1000.0/60.0) AS [Elapsed Min],
CONVERT(NUMERIC(10,2),r.estimated_completion_time/1000.0/60.0) AS [ETA Min],
CONVERT(NUMERIC(10,2),r.estimated_completion_time/1000.0/60.0/60.0) AS [ETA Hours],
CONVERT(VARCHAR(1000),(SELECT SUBSTRING(text,r.statement_start_offset/2,
CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1 THEN 1000 ELSE (r.statement_end_offset-r.statement_start_offset)/2 END)
FROM sys.dm_exec_sql_text(sql_handle)))
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests r WHERE command IN (‘RESTORE DATABASE’,'BACKUP DATABASE’)

. . .

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Stopping Internet Explorer 11 from showing the mobile express version of Dynamics CRM 2011

If you have a Dynamics CRM 2011 installation, and users have started using Internet Explorer 11 (either by upgrading from IE10, or by installing Windows 8), then you’ve undoubtedly noticed that, when an IE11 user goes to your CRM site, they are greeted by the Mobile Express version, rather than the standard site. There are a few manual workarounds to this:

Downgrade from IE11 to IE10 (not an option for Windows 8).
Add your CRM domain name to the compatibility list in IE11 (not an option if you don’t want the entire domain to be in compatibility mode, or if you have group policy settings which prohibit this).
Instruct users to go to https://yourcrmdomain.com/main.aspx.

That third bullet is interesting… If you go to the root of your CRM domain name in IE11, you will be redirected to the Mobile Express site. If you go to the “main.aspx” page on the root, you go to the full CRM site. . . .

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First day without coffee… or not?

I’m going to make an announcement that may come as a shock to anyone who knows me…

I’ve voluntarily decided to give up coffee.

Those that know me will probably react like the first person who saw me walking around today with a cup of water instead of a cup of coffee: they laughed. I was a heavy coffee drinker, about 5 cups a day. I enjoyed my coffee. I blogged about the wonders of coffee. I identified myself with a cup of coffee. I bought coffee for co-workers, and they bought it for me. I went out for coffee breaks when the smokers went out for cigarette breaks. I looked forward to drinking coffee…

So why the change? Ultimately, it came down to health and stress. I drink too much coffee (caffeine) and not enough water, and I’ve been too stressed lately. Coffee (caffeine) is not helping either of those.

After writing that, I decided . . .

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Sync or synch as short for synchronize?

Today at work, someone wrote the following as a work item summary: “Synch production and test data”.

Reading this, I thought, “Which is correct – sync or synch – when shortening synchronize?

The winner is sync, and here’s why:

We pronounce either variant as sink.
c alone is often pronounced k (cake, panic)
ch alone is often pronounced ch (church, match)
Sync = ”sink”
Synch = “sinch”
One less keystroke for sync

I was happy with that until reading an article on The Language Lover’s Blog, “Sync or Synch?“, which made me conscious of other common variants, such as psych as short for psychology.

Ultimately, my search was put to bed when I read this comment:

you guys are such nerds!!! the world really doesnt care about the voiceles velar fricative converting to a velar plosive. blogging should be eliminated from the internet.

Guilty as charged…

. . .

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The Runner’s Dilemma: A Story

Author’s Note: I am not a runner, and I probably never will be. My body isn’t made for running. But running is a good metaphor for journeys, and like many others, though I may not run, I still take many journeys in life, some with my body, some with my mind, and some with my heart. The below came to me this morning while driving to work, a journey in itself, as I reflected not on that journey, but on the greater journey of life, and how we get through it: one step at a time.

He had prepared for this for so long, so precisely; yet nothing was going as planned.

For years, he trained on a predictable track, its curves coming at regular intervals, its flatness something he didn’t have to think about. He trained on the perfect days, not too hot, not too cold, just the right amount of moisture in the air . . .

→ Read More: The Runner’s Dilemma: A Story